Firearms Industry Distribution Affected by Multiple Pieces of Legislation in 2018 and 2019

Posted by Orchid Advisors on 11/27/18 2:23 PM

orchidAs 2018 winds to a close and the holiday shopping seasons escalate to a fever pitch, we take a look back at some of the bills that passed and went into effect this year.  Several thousand pieces of legislation were proposed that could have an impact upon the industry. These laws broach many topics, including permissible hunting products, who may purchase or possess firearms, what firearm accessories are permissible to own, and restrictions on particular firearm configurations.  In their own way, each of the foregoing examples affects most industry members directly or indirectly. 

In today’s e-commerce retail environment, it is not uncommon for FFLs to regularly transact with buyers in other states. For businesses who routinely move products across state lines, knowledge of legislative activity in other locations can help mitigate risk and can be used to more wisely apply marketing and sales dollars.   Here are some of the more prominent and impactful pieces of legislation that were passed in 2018. 

 

California

SB 1100

Prohibits the sale of any firearm to a person under 21 years of age.

California

SB 1346

Clarifies that the already-existing ban on “multiburst trigger activators” includes bump stocks.

Connecticut

HB 5542

Bans bump stocks, binary triggers, and other accessories to increase the rate of a fire of a firearm.

Delaware

HB 300

Prohibits bump stocks and trigger cranks.  

Florida

SB 7026

Prohibits FFLs from selling firearms to persons under 21 years of age; creates a waiting period for firearm purchases which is the later of 3 days (excluding weekends and legal holidays or the completion of the records check; includes a bump stock ban.

Florida

HB 55

Requires Department of Law Enforcement procedures to allow the payment of processing fees for criminal history checks of potential firearms buyers by electronic means.

Hawaii

SB 2046

Prohibits trigger modification devices, including bump stocks, trigger cranks, and binary triggers, that are designed or function to accelerate the rate of fire of a semiautomatic firearm.

Maryland

SB 707

Prohibits binary triggers, hellfire triggers, trigger cranks, bump stocks, and other devices or accessories that cause a firearms rate of fire to increase.

New Jersey

S 3477

Prohibits bump stocks. 

New Jersey

A 2761

Reduces lawful magazine capacity from 15 to 10, with the exception of attached tubular devices capable of operating only with .22 caliber rimfire ammunition.

New Jersey

A 2757

Implements Universal Background Checks, with certain limited exceptions.

New Jersey

A 2759

Prohibits possession of handgun ammunition which has a full metal jacket and an ogive with a steel penetrator tip followed by an aluminum core.

New Jersey

S 2465

Establishes crimes of purchasing firearm parts to unlawfully manufacture firearms without a serial number, manufacturing or possessing covert or undetectable firearms, and manufacturing or facilitating the manufacture of firearms using a three-dimensional printer.

Rhode Island

S 2292

Prohibits bump stocks, trigger cranks, binary triggers, and other devices and accessories designed to accelerate the rate of fire of a semi-automatic weapon.

Vermont

S 55

Among its provisions, it provides for: Universal Background Checks (with limited exceptions); no firearms sales to persons under 21 (with limited exceptions); a large capacity magazine ban restricting magazines to 10 rounds for long guns and 15 rounds for handguns (excluding attached tubular devices designed and capable of operating only with .22 caliber rimfire ammunition and magazines solely for lever action or bolt action long guns), and a bump-fire stock ban. 

Washington

SB 5992

Creates a bump stock ban.

Wisconsin

AB 820

Creates a procedure that law enforcement officers and courts must  follow to temporarily or permanently close any portion of a sport shooting range due to an alleged unsafe condition on the premises.

As business owners continue to expand into new markets through internet sales, it becomes all the more necessary – and difficult – to track the ever-changing landscape of state firearm legislation. Fortunately, there is an easier way.  Visit www.orchidadvisors.com/Determine-legality-by-state/ to view the OA-NASGW State Restrictions App and learn how it can help you to distribute your products nationwide.

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